@thethirdculturekidproject – #wordsofwisdom

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@thethirdculturekidproject – borders

the third culture kid project - thetckproject - borders

TCKs are cross­culturally mobile children, born into a first culture and raised in one or more additional cultures. Their emergent life­style produces a third culture that lacks national or cultural boundaries. TCKs are marginal, mobile in body, soul, and intellect. Their roots lie in uprootedness. They fit in everywhere, nowhere in particular. They are simultaneously insiders and outsiders. TCKs perform a mediating role between cultures. TCK writers play the role of cultural mediator, while other TCKs move to the center of the worlds of global business and politics.
-Ayla Delin, Istanbul, writing in Time, March 1, 1993

@thethirdculturekidproject – patriotism

the third culture kid project - tck project

In truth, children who live abroad often feel more patriotic than teenagers who have lived in their own country all their lives. Unfortunately, this feeling is often based on romantic movies, vague childhood memories, stories told by parents, and hasty impressions that the children themselves made while on home leave. When they finally return home for good, they may find that their own country is more foreign than any land they ever encountered, even though the whole time they fancied they knew exactly what the place would be like.
– Karen McClure

@thethirdculturekidproject – culture clash

the third culture kid project - culture clashes

The problems are that TCKs may appear arrogant (if not actually arrogant) to monocultural people because of their wealth of knowledge and experience. Their rootlessness may keep them switching from college to college or from job to job. Their grief because of all the good­byes they have experienced over and over again, if unexpressed and unresolved, may lead to deep seated anger or depression. Their experience of frequent good­byes may also make them hesitant to form close relationships for fear of being hurt again but that can result in terrible loneliness.
– Up the Ghat, M.C. Tegenfeldt